Do You Know Your Excavation Shoring Options?

Written by Small Business Magazine on December 6, 2017. Posted in Uncategorized

types of shoring for excavation

Excavation and trenching projects can be dangerous. With the risk of collapses and cave-ins, workers can unknowingly be in harm’s way. This is why excavation shoring systems are key. There are several types of shoring for excavations that can keep your crew safe during these types of projects.

When do I need a shoring system?
If you are working in a trench five feet deep or greater, the trench will need a shoring system unless the excavation is made of stable rock. Crews working in trenches 20 feet deep or greater will need to have a professional engineer design the system. While these are the minimum requirements, you can also take precautions with a shoring system if your trench is less deep than these benchmarks.

What factors should I consider when choosing a shoring system?
Soil quality and other environmental conditions are key in determining which shoring system to use. As mentioned above, an excavation made of solid rock will require less protection than one made of moist soil. The soil inside and surrounding the trench should be considered, as should any recent rainfall. To further pinpoint these conditions, your crew should hire an outside professional.

What are the different types of shoring systems?
The following are some of the most common types of shoring types of shoring for excavation available on the market.

  • Hydraulic Shoring: This strut and wale system is often made of steel, making it one of the most durable shoring methods. The braces hold steady against the trench wall and adapt easily to various widths.
  • Timber Shoring: While less popular than hydraulic methods, timber shoring is made out of wood. This is often a less expensive option.
  • Aluminum Shoring: Aluminum is a highly durable material but is lighter weight than steel. For this reason, many construction crews prefer aluminum shoring methods. These materials are easily transported and stored.

Remember: Your crew’s shoring needs will likely vary by project. This is why renting is often a viable option. When you begin a new project, you can rent the system and then start again on the next project. And if you are not sure which shoring method to rent, your equipment rental company can help you decide.

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